Rose Petroleum plc

German Licence

The Weiden Basin is a sedimentary basin, located in southeastern Germany, containing up to 2800 metres of Upper Carboniferous-Lower Permian fluvial-lacustrine sediments, including black shales, coal beds and sandstones. In 1989, the Weiden-1 geothermal well was drilled by the municipality of Weiden and, following analysis, indicated the presence of oil in the Permian sandstones. A core, bleeding of oil, was recovered from the well.

Several 2-D seismic lines were shot across the area indicating a number of prospective conventional targets, but no additional wells have been drilled to date. The conventional targets consist of structural traps in the Permian sandstones charged with oil from Paleozoic source rocks. The seal is provided by interbedded shales. Oil was generated and expelled in the trough, and is trapped in the Permian sands as indicated by the Weiden-1 well.


In 1989, the town of Weiden drilled a geothermal well (Weiden-1) which indicated the presence of oil in the Permian sandstones. A core, bleeding of oil, was recovered and, following analyses, it was reported that the oil came from Permian-Carboniferous source rocks.

Following this discovery, the town of Weiden then applied in 1989 for a petroleum exploration licence in a small area surrounding the town, but relinquished the area in 1991. The exploration efforts were subsequently taken up by the consortium of Preussag/Maxus, German and Texas headquartered companies. The permit awarded to these two companies was called "Oberpfalz". This permit included all the prospective area of the Weiden Basin and the consortium shot four new seismic lines. However, the permit was relinquished in 1994 and the seismic data was subsequently acquired by Gaz de France (Germany), when it took over Preussag. At the time, Preussag's chief geophysicist published some of the seismic data and structural maps. Several potential conventional targets are indicated in this seismic data.

Conventional prospectivity is expected to focus on the oil charged by Paleozoic source rocks, found in Permian sandstones, in structural traps. The seal rock is provided by interbedded shales. Oil was generated and expelled in the trough, as indicated by the Weiden-1 well. Rose plans to obtain the data from the Weiden-1 well which is available and currently held in a university depositary.

Rose has already obtained geochemical analyses recovered from outcropping Upper Carboniferous (Stephanian) black shales in the Weiden Basin, with TOC values of 16-18%. These shales demonstrate an early oil generation maturity. A working petroleum system therefore appears present in the form of a petroleum source rock, good reservoir sandstones and evidence that oil has been generated and expelled (from the Weiden-1 core). Rose has also used geochemical analysis to establish the existence of additional good quality black shale in the marine Lower Jurassic Posidonia Shales found in the Weiden Basin region with a TOC of 7.6%.